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Quinn Jacobson WET COLLODION April 17, 2011

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : American Photographers, Art , trackback

Quinn Jacobson is a fine art photographer with a special interest in early photographic processes who has published a book on the early chemical processes and sells it from his website. I came across his work in Square Magazine and wanted to share it with readers.

The work is hauntingly beautiful, painstaking and collaborative.

http://studioq.com/

Photo Quinn Jacobson
Photo Quinn Jacobson

WET COLLODION PROCESS

In 1846, Christian Frederick Schönbein (1799-1868) of Basel, Switzerland, discovered nitrated cotton (guncotton) by combining cotton fibers in a mixture of sulfuric and nitric acids. Two years later, in 1848, a young medical student in Boston by the name of John Parker Maynard formulated a durable, skin like, medical dressing (like liquid bandage) from the guncotton called “collodion” (from Greek kollōdēs, glutinous, glue-like) that could be used to treat wounds.

In 1850, Gustave Le Gray (1820-1884) proposed the idea that Dr. Parker’s collodion solution could be applied to photographic purposes because it was an excellent vehicle for holding a light-sensitive solution on glass.
In March 1851, Frederick Scott Archer (1813-1857) described an application of salted collodion on sheets of glass for the purpose of making glass plate negatives. Archer detailed a process where potassium iodide was combined with a solution of diluted collodion (diluted with alcohol and ether), applied to a glass plate, which was then immersed in a silver nitrate bath resulting in a light-sensitive layer of silver iodide. Unlike the handful of processes before collodion, Archer did not patent the process and died penniless a few years after its invention (1857).

CHEMICAL PICTURES A book on alternative photographic processes
http://studioq.com/chemical-pictures-book/

Photo Quinn Jacobson
Photo Quinn Jacobson

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