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The survival of Australia’s endangered languages – an audio-photo essay by sound artist Jonathan Mustard and photojournalist Martine Perret February 4, 2017

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : Metaphor Online, The Guardian , comments closed

This post is shared from The Guardian newspaper and asks important questions about culture and language through Marine Perret’s photo essay.

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/ng-interactive/2016/sep/30/the-survival-of-australias-endangered-languages-an-audio-photo-essay

Dinny Smith (pictured above left and heard singing) is a Panagka man, born with the traditional name Kuyayin in the desert region of Jameson (Mantamaru). His language is Ngaanyatjarra; Laurel Ngunu Cooper (pictured above and heard whispering) was taken away from her parents when she was five years old. She is part of the Stolen Generations; Deborah Cutter (top picture) is seen having fun after a long day hunting goannas and kangaroos in the bush around Wiluna, Western Australia. A baby kangaroo she rescued from the one of the hunted is hiding inside her shirt.

Photographer Martine Perret’s haunting images and audio recordings from Western Australia capture its landscape, people and native languages – some of them close to extinction. The work, titled Ngala Wongga (meaning Come Talk), has been  on show at Goldfields Arts Centre on 30 September for six weeks and will open in Perth on 8 February 2017. Within it she asks: ‘What is the future for Australian Indigenous languages?’

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are advised that this photo essay may contain images and voices of people who have passed away. In publishing this essay, we wish to honour and celebrate their lives.

As a young child, Glenys Williams (pictured below) used to speak Putijarra language. She now speaks Mardu language. In 2004, there were estimated to be four speakers of the Putijarra language. It is a highly endangered language. ‘When I was young, I lived at Lorna Glen station, 150km north east of Wiluna,’ she says. ‘At that time, I did not learn how to get food from the bush by my parents. I feel I grew up as a ‘white’ person as I was never taught the traditional Aboriginal customs.’

The survival of Australian endangered languages: Martine Perret for The Guardian October 7, 2016

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : Martine Perret, Metaphor Online, The Guardian , comments closed

Photo Martine Perret

The survival of Australia’s endangered languages – an audio-photo essay

Photographer Martine Perret’s haunting images and audio recordings from Western Australia capture its landscape, people and native languages – some of them close to extinction. The work, titled Ngala Wongga (meaning Come Talk), goes on show at Goldfields Arts Centre on 30 September for six weeks and will travel to Perth in February 2017. Within it she asks: ‘What is the future for Australian Indigenous languages?’

Martine Perret

Photo Martine Perret

• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are advised that this photo essay may contain images and voices of people who have passed away. In publishing this essay, we wish to honour and celebrate their lives.

Martine Perret

• Our country, our voices: a Guardian Australia series on Indigenous languages

http://martineperret.photoshelter.com

Nan Goldin INSIDE Reading Prison September 7, 2016

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : Metaphor Online, Nan Goldin, The Guardian , comments closed

Photo William Eckersby

Nan Goldin is guiding the way through her unlikely exhibition space in Reading prison, which comprises a row of cells on C Wing, close to where, in the summer of 1895, Oscar Wilde began a two-year sentence for gross indecency following the failure of his libel case against the Marquis of Queensbury. Goldin discovered the writer at the age of 15 and he became a huge influence on her. “What I understood him to be saying is that you can be who you pretend to be,” she says. “You can remake yourself completely. That idea drove my desire to create myself though my art.”

 

 

As if to exorcise the silence and the solitude, one of Goldin’s pieces is a video interview with a 91-year-old man who is still campaigning for an apology from the government for his conviction for homosexuality 70 years ago. His posh voice booms out into the silence of the prison like an accusation. Next door are two more screens, each featuring synched videos of early silent film versions of Wilde’s play SalomeNext door again is an edited version of French writer Jean Genet’s only film, Un Chant d’Amoura poetic depiction of homosexual desire in a prison. It can only be viewed though the slim, murky window in the door.

Goldin has always sided with outsiders – the drag queens, drug addicts and wayward friends whose lives are glimpsed in her groundbreakingly raw and intimate photobooks, such as The Ballad of Sexual Dependency and The Devil’s Playground.

Having just spent a few sombre minutes in C.3.3. (Wilde’s cell, though it’s now changed due to a revised numbering system), I ask Goldin if she has found it an oppressive place. “Strangely, no,” she says. “I think I’m desensitised to it. What has got to me is the fact that he spent so much time in solitary confinement with just one page of blank paper to write on a day. I cannot begin to imagine how someone as social and talkative and outgoing as him survived. It makes me angry even to think about it.”

https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2016/sep/05/nan-goldin-oscar-wilde-inside-exhibition-reading-prison-artangel

Women Photojournalists on the Front Line from the Guardian June 19, 2014

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : The Guardian, Women Photojournalists , comments closed

Photographer Lynsey Addario near the frontline during a pause in the fighting in Libya in 2011, a fe

Photographer Lynsey Addario near the frontline during a pause in fighting in Libya in 2011, a few days before she was kidnapped. She was released a few days later. Photograph: John Moore/Getty Images

For female photojournalists the past six weeks have been a particularly brutal reminder of the dangers they face. Two photographers have recently been killed while making a record of the suffering on humanity’s most extreme edges, documenting the otherwise hidden effects of war on people left to endure tremendous hardship and pain.

German photographer Anja Niedringhaus was shot dead at a checkpoint in Afghanistan on 4 April by a man in police uniform, and just four weeks later, a young French photographer, Camille Lepage, died of gunshot wounds in the Central African Republic. The French government has said Lepage was deliberately targeted and murdered, although it remains unclear if this was at the hands of the Christian militias with whom she was travelling or whether, in fact, her death was an accident and she was caught in crossfire.

“This is a profession of the brave and the passionate, those committed to the mission of bringing to the world information that is fair, accurate and important,” said Gary Pruitt, president of the Associated Press, after Niedringhaus’s death. “Anja Niedringhaus met that definition in every way.”