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Magnum Manifesto June 15, 2017

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : Magnum, Metaphor Images , comments closed

NEW YORK, NY (APRIL 21, 2017) — The International Center of Photography (ICP), the world’s leading institution dedicated to photography and visual culture, continues its designated “Year of Social Change” with Magnum Manifesto, which celebrates the 70th anniversary of the renowned Magnum Photos collective. Premiering at the ICP Museum (250 Bowery, New York, NY) on May 26, the landmark exhibition underscores ICP’s long-standing connection to concerned photography and the social and historic impact of the medium as a whole.

“When you look through the Magnum archive, you cannot help but feel a mixture of jubilation and vertigo.

The vast collection of images and information amassed over the seven decades since the creation of the cooperative—the great events of the day, together with the commonplace facts and deeds of everyday life, the laughter, the violence, moments of magic or of symbolic signi cance, and even representations of abstract thought—potentially it contains all the histories of the world,” says Chéroux. “Magnum Manifesto points to how vast the exploitable elds covered by the collection are. It offers a small reconstruction of the entire range of human experience and shows that Magnum is a world in itself.”

The exhibition is organized into three main parts:
• Part I: 1947–1968: “Human Rights and Wrongs” views the Magnum archive through a humanist lens, focusing on post-war ideals of commonality and utopianism. A centerpiece of this section will be the Paul Fusco series, RFK Funeral Train.

• Part II: 1969–1989: “An Inventory of Differences” shows a world fragmenting, with a focus on subcultures, minorities, and outsiders. This section features images from a range of photographers, including Danny Lyon and Susan Meiselas.

• Part III: 1990–2017: “Stories about Endings” charts the ways in which Magnum photographers have captured—and continue to capture—a world in flux and under threat, from Thomas Dworzak’s images of the Taliban to Donovan Wyle’s Maze series, and very recent photos such as those from Alessandra Sanguinetti in the aftermath of the Nice terrorist attacks.

CZECHOSLOVAKIA. Slovakia. Zehra. 1967. Gypsies.

Magnum Manifesto features group and individual projects and includes more than 250 prints and 300 projected photographs, as well as more than 130 objects—books, magazines, videos, and rarely-seen archival documents. Among many others, it incorporates the work of Christopher Anderson, Jonas Bendiksen, Henri Cartier- Bresson, Cornell and Robert Capa, Chim, Raymond Depardon, Bieke Depoorter, Elliott Erwitt, Martine Franck, Leonard Freed, Paul Fusco, Cristina Garcia Rodero, Burt Glinn, Jim Goldberg, Joseph Koudelka, Sergio Larrain, Susan Meiselas, Wayne Miller, Martin Parr, Marc Riboud, Alessandra Sanguinetti, Eugene W. Smith, Alec Soth, Chris Steele-Perkins, Dennis Stock, Mikhael Subotzky, and Alex Webb.

ICP’s presentation of Magnum Manifesto is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, and by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Collecting History Now: Harriet Logan of the INCITE PROJECT and its curator Tristan Lund on building a collection of images of war, conflict and other challenging themes June 5, 2017

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Collecting History Now: A Collector and an Art Advisor Discuss

Harriet Logan of the Incite Project and its curator Tristan Lund on building a collection of images of war, conflict and other challenging themes:

With a large print of Richard Drew’s famous shot of a man falling from the World Trade Centre featuring prominently on the stairs of her home, former photojournalist, and now collector of photography, Harriet Logan wants the rest of the world to see and appreciate some of the more difficult images in photojournalism as large prints displayed on a wall. With the collection she started to build only four years ago, Logan wants to show that “photojournalism is not purely an illustration for text” and to both define and preserve important moments of history and history-in-the-making. In doing so she aims to support photojournalists producing work today. The Incite Project, run by Harriet Logan and her husband, is a private collection of issue-driven photographic prints, motivated by current political and social concerns that are still within our power to change.

Also featuring in Logan’s private collection are: a Tom Stoddart shot from Sarajevo; Josef Koudelka’s photograph of a gypsy with a horse – “that’s one of my favourites, if the house was on fire we’d take that picture,” she says; and work by Diane Arbus, Richard Mosse, Moises Saman and Robert Capa. And in her dream collection she’d like to own Koudelka’s iconic picture of a dog, which she narrowly missed out on at an auction, having stuck diligently to her set budget. Logan and the collection’s curator Tristan Lund, recently spoke to Magnum about the motivation to collect contemporary photojournalism.

Motivation to start a collection

Starting her collection with Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother, Logan initially focused on collecting a foundation of exceptional, history-defining, photographs, images that condense major global events into singular objects.

“I hate the word iconic, but it was about collecting the lynchpins of historical photography and documentary photography. I was immediately drawn to Koudelka, Cartier-Bresson and Capa – the ‘godfathers’ of photography, I suppose – and the people that, in my opinion, made images that defined history. That, to me, is the important part of it, particularly now when we live in a world in which everyone is a photographer and history seems to be quite blurred. I’m really interested in the images that are produced almost on a daily basis and how they define the world that we’re living in today.

What’s interesting is how a point in history becomes so defined by an image – the falling man from 9/11, everyone knows that picture. For me it’s such a key, emotive image; we have it printed huge. That moment in history has been condensed down to a single image. Like the tank man in Tiananmen Square, history stops at those still images, and the photographers that took those pictures did an incredible job of essentially isolating, for all of us, those moments of history.” – Harriet Logan

Living with difficult images

Despite the images often being quite difficult to look at, Logan is compelled to give the photographs, and the photographers who took them, a respect she feels they deserve, no doubt down to her own experience as a photojournalist in the field: “Someone has had the drive to actually get out there and show us something about the world we’re living in. I feel like not looking at those pictures is bizarre for me because I think we have an obligation to see them. They went and they made these pictures and to not look at them, I feel is wrong. I feel like the least I could do is look at them every day. The idea of these images getting stuck in drawers and forgotten about feels slightly irresponsible.” – Harriet Logan

Collecting living photographers’ work

By focusing on collecting the work of living photographers who are currently creating work, Logan is able to support their ongoing projects. “We made a decision a while ago to stop buying a dead photographer’s work unless it was something that was an obvious hole in the collection, and that we would really go after photographers who were out there today creating work that we felt was important,” she says.

Logan’s primary motivation is to support the continued work of contemporary photojournalists, and enable the production of more work. She’s supported Matt Black’s Geography of Poverty, enabling the photographer to continue to build a comprehensive document of poverty across the United States, in return for prints of his work; and she’s also supported Magnum’s Moises Saman’s acclaimed Discordia book project, a visual account of the Arab Spring, made up of work compiled over four years spent living in the Middle East, and received prints of this work to add to her collection.

Scouting and supporting new talent

Harriet Logan’s collection spans the true photojournalist heavyweights, established contemporary names, as well as virtual unknowns. She has followed the career of some photographers from emerging talents to in-demand names in the print market. As well as visiting galleries and fairs, Lund and Logan do other types of legwork of their own to find new photojournalists to collect, looking at awards, such as World Press and the Eugene Smith awards, as well as scrolling through Instagram. “We’re taking it beyond what we are offered by galleries, so we’re trying to be proactive about the way we find images and approach photographers,” says Lund.

“We definitely hope it’s encouraging for young photographers that we are coming to them directly and asking to turn their work into physical prints that will go into the collection,” says Lund. “You rarely get shown prints by a photographer now, and one of the things that we feel is really important is that photographers, particularly young photographers, learn the value of printing a set of prints and editioning and signing them – seeing the value of them as a physical object,” adds Logan.

From Instagram to wall

The photographers who have successfully caught the eye of collectors on Instagram, but who also produce highly prized print products take as much care on the fabrication and printing of their fine prints as they do curating their Instagram feed. Magnum photographer – and former printing tech Matt Black – is a case in point. Black’s bold and graphic style has earned him a huge Instagram following, while his printing, which is produced to exacting standards, creates an object that collectors are keen to own.

“The amazing thing about Matt Black’s work, was seeing his photographs as an Instagram feed and then seeing his work in a gallery. He prints really beautifully; they are such wonderful objects. I was blown away by the quality of his printing.” – Harriet Logan

Purity of the work

What appears to attract Logan to the work of the photojournalists she likes is a purity of intent in their work. She cites Magnum’s Josef Koudelka ‘s “honourable” approach as an example. “I think Koudelka is quite an interesting example of a photographer who sees the utmost importance in the physical object, who has been very controlling of what’s out there in the world,” she says. “I don’t think he’s interested in the money that his prints are worth at all. He’s interested in the home that it goes to and where it ends up, and that’s very honourable.”

Logan also sees a similar quality in Matt Black. Black, she says, “feels like a really pure storyteller, in his vision and the way that he sees. It seems like he’s been able to do that because he’s sticking to his belief in how he sees.”

Elevating the photojournalist

Through elevating single images and taking them out of the context in which they are usually experienced – on a page, next to the text of the story which they illustrate – Logan and Lund want to give photojournalists the recognition they feel is deserved. Lund explains: “We are really trying to show that photojournalism is not purely an illustration for text. Removing the text, putting the printed photograph in a frame and behind glass and treating it as a work of art definitely makes people slow down but also makes them consider that somebody went and made that work; it wasn’t just chance that the camera happened to be there at the right place at the right time.”

History through a Lens: Iconic Photographs from the Incite Project has been on at the Victoria Art Gallery in Bath.

 

 

 

 

Trading to Extinction: Patrick Brown PICTURE PERFECT SERIES from VICE May 26, 2017

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : Metaphor Images, Picture Perfect VICE , comments closed
Good to rediscover a series like PICTURE PERFECT from VICE that was first published on 11 Apr 2012.

In this episode of Picture Perfect, VICE visits Patrick Brown in Bangkok, Thailand to discuss photography and his book Trading to Extinction, which documents the illegal trade of endangered animals in Asia. VICE travels with Brown to Guangzhou, China, where he photographs restaurants that buy and serve exotic animals.

This series has You Tube documentaries that include the work of Donald Weber from Canada, James Mollison, Rob Hornstra, Chris Anderson, Vincent Fournier, Chloe Dewe Mathews and is important to check out for to help any photographer to understand what photographers experience on the road. Googling PICTURE PERFECT will help find what are essentially life journeys that many of these photographers have actually lived. Several of these photographers I have personally met at Visa Pour Le Image in Perpignan France and they all have amazing stories to tell.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSmzGIFhHHo&feature=em-subs_digest-vrecs

West Australian Election turns dirty: Photos Bohdan Warchomij March 10, 2017

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POLICE were called to the Paddington Ale House where protesters were disrupting an event being hosted by One Nation leader Pauline Hanson who started her evening with a Sky News interview.

Accusations of racism and fascism were liberally and passionately dispersed through doggerel political chants by the protesters who were well organised.

One Nation supporters egged the young protesters on through out the protest.

Senator Hanson, who is in WA as part of a week long campaign ahead of the State Election on Saturday, held a Pizza and Pots event inside the Mount Hawthorn pub for her supporters.

There were reports of punches being thrown outside the hotel after about 50 protesters gathered outside the pub at about 7pm and that at least one person was taken away by police. There were confrontations between the protestors and One Nation supporters who were separated by police.

Police said that two people were issued with move on notices but no arrests were made.

Robert McPherson Metaphor Images: A finalist in the Jacob Riis 5th Documentary award March 3, 2017

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Photos Robert McPherson/Metaphor Images

Congratulations are due to Robert McPherson.

Robert McPherson/ Metaphor Images: Robert is a finalist in the Jacob Riis 5th Documentary award
A short series from Robert McPherson’s latest trip to Nepal from a  brick factory Kathmandu. 
Title: BRICK BY BRICK.

Photos Robert McPherson/Metaphor Images

Story description: 

600,000 homes were destroyed by the earthquake that struck Nepal in April 2015. The demand for bricks to rebuild new houses increased, and child labour is involved in rebuilding the country.

In Nepal 28,000 children are engaged in child labour.

Children who work at brick factories breathe in dangerous red dust that circulates in the air.

One consequence is chronic bronchitis.

Children die yearly in relation to accidents in the workplace.

Besides long hours and heavy work, the brick factories have consistently poor sanitation facilities that also lead to other diseases.

http://www.thegalaawards.co.uk/anncmt-5th-j-riis.html

THE WINNER OF THE JACOB RIIS DOCUMENTARY AWARD (5th Edition):

FAUSTO PODAVINI  (Rome, Italy), for his Series MiRelLa.

Australia’s INGETJE TADROS  (Broome, Australia)

was a finalist

for her Series Kennedy Hill

Covering the Ukraine invasion: Anton Skyba for the Globe and Mail February 27, 2017

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : Anton Skyba Photojournalist, Mark McKinnon, Metaphor Images, Metaphor Online, The Globe and Mail , comments closed

In 2004 I was lucky to work for the Globe and Mail for Mark McKinnon and Jeremy Page during the Orange Revolution in Ukraine.

It was the opportunity of a lifetime for a freelance photographer, confronting history and working for two amazing journalists.

It kicked off a long free lance career for me that has led me back to Ukraine regularly to astonishing scenarios and opportunities to share on the scene realities. Reporting on the downing of Malaysia’s MH17 in Torres was my most recent and most traumatic experience.

Mark McKinnon continues to report on Ukraine for the Globe and Mail and correlates the connection between the inauguration of Donald Trump as US president and the newest outbreaks in the eastern frontline of Ukraine. Photojournalist Anton Skyba has contributed extensively to Mark McKinnon’s latest report.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/as-russia-us-ties-strengthen-violence-escalates-inukraine/article34143679/

“It was six days after the first official phone call between U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin that a rocket destroyed Nina Zharekova’s kitchen.

Nobody was hurt, Ms. Zharekova whispers, peering up through the hole left when a Grad rocket, fired by Russian-backed separatists positioned just a few kilometres away, tore through the roof of the modest home she shares with her daughter and five-year-old grandson. “But it’s a miracle we’re alive.”

A relative quiet had reigned for months along the swerving front line between the Ukrainian army and the separatists who control two enclaves along the Russian border. But the day after the Jan. 28 call between Mr. Trump and Mr. Putin, the regular rattle of small weapons in Ukraine’s Donbass region was replaced by the thunder of artillery, tank and rocket fire, all of it in violation of a 2015 ceasefire agreement.

It’s almost as though someone is trying to test the rookie U.S. leader – by roughly tripling the level of violence – to find out where he really stands on the three-year-old war in what used to be Ukraine’s industrial heartland.”

MARK MACKINNON

SARTANA, UKRAINE

THE GLOBE AND MAIL

LAST UPDATED: 

THE EXPERIENCE OF ANTON SKYBA UKRAINIAN PHOTO JOURNALIST

In 2014 a young reporter Anton Skyba spoke excitedly in Lviv about his experiences on the frontlines in eastern Ukraine. He described Russian-backed separatists shelling villages and sending civilians running for their lives.

“I can’t believe this is happening in my homeland,” said Anton Skyba, who runs a small information agency and had never covered a war before. He is lucky to be alive.

When he ventured into territory held by pro-Russian forces, he was captured, beaten and accused of spying, he said. After being held for several days, he was turned over to another rebel group, which freed him.

Skyba recalled these events during the November 2014 Media Forum held in Lviv, Ukraine, near the Polish border. The crowd was abuzz with reports that Russian troops and tanks were pouring over the border. Four months later, Business Insider included Ukraine on its list of the world’s 15 worst war zones.

“Our journalists are not experienced war correspondents. They are not ready for this,” said forum organizer Ostap Protsyk. “[The Russian invasion] is the biggest story for us. Our media have to cover it.”

Skyba’s story echoes a harrowing trend of local journalists switching from education, politics and crime beats to reporting on the violence in their back yard when conflict strikes. Many have paid dearly.

A JOURNALIST’S SAFETY GUIDE

The Committee to Protect Journalists reports that nearly nine in 10 work-related fatalities since 1992 involved journalists covering news in their own country. More than 95 percent of journalists jailed worldwide are local reporters, photojournalists, bloggers and editors, according to CPJ.

After the Lviv Media Forum, around 40 members of the Ukrainian press corps gathered for a workshop on safety tips. Among the advice:

With the 2015 Global Risks report listing international conflict as the greatest threat to world stability over the next 10 years, the realities of 21st century conflict underscore a key point: The need for safety training for journalists has never been greater.

Global media watchdogs have compiled resources and guidelines for journalists covering conflict. Here is a sampling of what’s available online:

Street Party in Northbridge City of Perth for New Years Eve Photos Bohdan Warchomij January 2, 2017

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Quiet celebrations in Northbridge posed few problems for police and paramedics as revellers turned up in smaller numbers and behaved themselves  at Perth’s Northbridge Piazza, Latin American dancers made a video at sunset at  Scarborough Beach to promote an approaching  dance festival in April and young women took selfies of themselves at midnight to record  the approach of a new year.

Business as usual.

Happy New Year 2017.

Mother Theresa Now A Saint of Calcutta Photos Bohdan Warchomij September 7, 2016

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : Bohdan Warchomij Photographer, Metaphor Images, Metaphor Online , comments closed

I took these photos in 1997 just after Mother Theresa’s death in the city that was synonymous  with her charity.

I worked in her hospices, and her orphanages and her clinics and on the streets for a period of six weeks after meeting Perth sister Sister Ella,

who inspired me to take the trip to Kolkata. It took time to organise the trip and Mother Theresa had passed away by the time I got there.

Her successor Sister Nirmala and her entourage were swamped by the world’s media at the time but I was given access to Mother House and volunteered

wherever I could with girls from Germany, France, and the USA and walked the streets of the City of Joy with them when their day’s work was finished. I worked with an NGO called Calcutta Rescue founded by a wonderful man called Jack Preger in 1980.

These photos remind of the spirituality I felt at Mother House and formed the basis of my first and only exhibition at the Perth Centre for Photography when it shared a space with the Blue Room in Perth’s Cultural Centre.

 

 

Finlandisation Juha Tolonen: Artist’s Talk Art Gallery of WA September 2, 2016

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Finlandisation is a series of landscape photographs that focus on the seemingly disparate landscapes of the Swan River hinterland and Lapland. While contrasts exist, Juha Tolonen’s new work also displays a surprising continuity.

Drawing from his adopted and ancestral homes of Australia and Finland his photographs reveal lands that are both alien and familiar.

Arranged in diptychs and triptychs, multiple viewpoints are used to contrast or to expand a scene. Tolonen never quite settles on an iconic view, but instead surveys the land inviting us to seek out recognisable elements through content, composition and arrangement.

Home is, after all, a place where we are surrounded by the familiar. But, due to forces both internal and external our picture of home is never quite complete. It’s this shifting view of what and where we call home that runs across Juha’s work.

JUHA TOLONEN: ABOUT THE ARTIST

Juha Tolonen (b. 1968, Geraldton, Australia) is a photographer, lecturer, researcher and writer. He is an Adjunct Lecturer at Edith Cowan University in Australia.

His work has been exhibited in major photography galleries around Australia including Australian Centre for Photography in Sydney and Centre for Contemporary Photography, Melbourne. His work has been exhibited internationally in the China Pingyao International Photography Festival. In 2012 he was awarded the biannual City of Perth Architectural Commission. In 2015 he was a Visiting Researcher at Aalto University in Helsinki, in the Department of Art.

His work has been published in leading photography journals including Photofile. He is the co-author of Photography and Landscape published by Intellect Books.

He currently lives and works in Lapland, Finland.

Register for artist’s talk here: http://www.artgallery.wa.gov.au/exhibitions/wa-focus-juha-tolonen.asp#talk

Second Anniversary of MH17 : a story from the Telegraph by Maxim Tucker KIEV, Ukraine July 20, 2016

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : Metaphor Images, Metaphor Online, The Telegraph , comments closed

Photo Bohdan Warchomij Metaphor Images

When aviation lawyer Jerry Skinner stopped by his suburban Cincinnati office last Christmas, he found the door ajar and the interior trashed. The files for his latest lawsuit, on behalf of victims of the Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 crash, were missing.

“They didn’t take anything else but they turned the rest of the office inside out,” he remembered. “The police couldn’t say who did it – whoever came into the office was careful.”

Thirty days earlier, the white-bearded, friendly-faced lawyer had issued a threat. Weighing up all the available photographic, video and witness evidence, he decided that the missile that blew the passenger jet apart mid-air, killing all 298 people on board, must have been a Russian one. And that it had been fired from rebel-held eastern Ukraine by soldiers ultimately under the command of President Vladimir Putin.

“I wrote to the embassy of the Russian Federation and to Vladimir Putin that I intended to bring an action against them – unless they wanted to sit down and talk – and I wanted to hear from them within 30 days,” he said. “Thirty days passed and I got robbed.” Mr Skinner suspected he was being targeted by Russia’s foreign intelligence service, the SVR. His computer was repeatedly hacked. Threatening voicemails accumulated on his answerphone.

So three days after the burglary, he quickly and quietly packed his remaining files and moved office in the dead of night. He changed his phone number and hid from public view as he built a case for his clients – 33 relatives of 16 Australian and Malaysian passengers who died after the plane crashed from 33,000 feet onto the black earth of Ukraine’s war-torn Donbas region.

Only now, with his lawsuit lodged last month at the European Court of Human Rights and hearings likely to begin later this year, has he emerged to publicise the families’ claim and call for more relatives to join the case.

He hopes that public pressure, combined with a report on the findings of an international criminal investigation into the MH17 tragedy due in the autumn, might encourage the Kremlin to come clean.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/07/17/mh17-anniversary-meet-the-man-suing-putin-who-now-fears-for-his/