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Photographer Marcus Bleasdale reporting on the Central African Republic Civil War for Human Rights Watch and National Geographic May 16, 2017

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : Human Rights Watch, Metaphor Online, National Geographic , comments closed
VIEWER DISCRETION ADVISED
THE HORROR OF CIVIL WAR
National Geographic Staff

PUBLISHED 

In recent years the Central African Republic (CAR) has posed some of the most vexing questions in Africa: How does a relatively large country (roughly the size of France), with a small population (4.5 million) and vast resources (including gold, diamonds, and timber), become a failed state? How does a place that has avoided major conflicts over its 57 years of independence and one that was most often seen as a haven for refugees from neighboring war-torn countries suddenly find itself become a killing ground?

Seeking answers to these questions, photographer Marcus Bleasdale and writer Peter Gwin traveled throughout the Central African Republic as it has reeled from a brutal civil war that has left thousands of its citizens dead, nearly a million displaced, and the nation’s meager infrastructure in ruins. Their story, “The Burning Heart of Africa,” appears in the May issue of National Geographic magazine.

During his years of reporting, Bleasdale also captured numerous hours of video footage that documents the unfolding of the conflict and provides an intimate look beyond the headlines. This is a view into the daily lives of the people trapped in the chaotic disintegration of their country and their determination to survive and rebuild.

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/photography/proof/2017/05/car-civil-war-behind-scenes/

Visual Journalism Grant April 12, 2012

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : Human Rights Watch, Tim Hetherington , add a comment

(New York) – To honor the life and work of the late Tim Hetherington, Human Rights Watch and World Press Photo have established an annual visual journalism award focusing on human rights, Human Rights Watch said today.

Hetherington, an award-winning photojournalist and filmmaker who produced unusually powerful human rights reportage throughout his career, was killed in the besieged city of Misrata on April 20, 2011, while covering the conflict in Libya. The celebrated photojournalist Chris Hondros was killed in the same attack.

“This award is a tribute to Tim Hetherington’s extraordinary talent for bringing human rights stories into vivid focus,” said Carroll Bogert, deputy executive director for external relations at Human Rights Watch. “The best photojournalism changes the world. We hope this grant will help more photographers think of their work in those terms.”

The annual grant of 20,000 euro seeks to reward a career history of documenting critical human rights stories and an ability to draw together diverse elements into a compelling multimedia feature.

After winning the 2007 World Press Photo of the Year for his image of an exhausted soldier, Hetherington said: “Underpinning my work is a concern with human rights and analyzing political ideas, with thinking about history and politics. It’s also about witnessing, about telling stories. Photography to me is a way of exploring the world, creating narratives, and communicating with as many people as possible… I am interested in working across a broad platform, in both screen based media and the print media.”

Human Rights Watch and World Press Photo have established the grant with the support of Hetherington’s parents, Alistair and Judith.

Human Rights Watch and World Press Photo will join a distinguished panel of judges to select the recipient of the first annual Tim Hetherington Grant in November, with the aim of allowing the winner to complete an existing project on a human rights theme. In reviewing the applications, the judges will look for the revolutionary qualities that defined Hetherington’s career: work that operates on multiple platforms and in a variety of formats; that crosses boundaries between breaking news and longer-term investigation; and that demonstrates a consistent moral commitment to the lives and stories of the photographic subjects.

“Tim told stories in a unique way, using images, sound, text, and testimony,” Bogert said. “We hope to honor his memory by encouraging others to innovate in the field of human rights communication.”

The deadline for applications is October 15, 2011. More information about the application procedure, including application forms to download, is available at www.worldpressphoto.org/.

Grant in Tim Hetherington’s Memory September 28, 2011

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : Human Rights Watch, Tim Hetherington , add a comment

To honor the life and work of the late Tim Hetherington, Human Rights Watch and World Press Photo have established an annual visual journalism award focusing on human rights, Human Rights Watch said today….

“This award is a tribute to Tim Hetherington’s extraordinary talent for bringing human rights stories into vivid focus,” said Carroll Bogert, deputy executive director for external relations at Human Rights Watch. “The best photojournalism changes the world. We hope this grant will help more photographers think of their work in those terms.”

The annual grant of 20,000 euro seeks to reward a career history of documenting critical human rights stories and an ability to draw together diverse elements into a compelling multimedia feature.

Human Rights Watch and World Press Photo have established the grant with the support of Hetherington’s parents, Alistair and Judith.

Human Rights Watch and World Press Photo will join a distinguished panel of judges to select the recipient of the first annual Tim Hetherington Grant in November, with the aim of allowing the winner to complete an existing project on a human rights theme. In reviewing the applications, the judges will look for the revolutionary qualities that defined Hetherington’s career: work that operates on multiple platforms and in a variety of formats; that crosses boundaries between breaking news and longer-term investigation; and that demonstrates a consistent moral commitment to the lives and stories of the photographic subjects….

The deadline for applications is October 15, 2011. More information about the application procedure, including application forms to download, is available at www.worldpressphoto.org/.