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Carli Davidson Goes Viral August 10, 2011

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : American Photographers, Carli Davidson , add a comment

Carli Davidson is an internationally recognized photographer. She has a background in both commercial and documentary photography, as well as over 7 years experience as an animal trainer and caretaker. Her love of both art and animals led her to work as an animal care technician and photographer for the Oregon Zoo, as well as a volunteer photographer for local animal rescues.

Her photography has been featured in Photo District News, The Atlantic, The Times UK, STERN Germany’s VIEW Magazine, Portland Monthly, The Village Voice, The Oregonian, The Portland Tribune, and numerous Zoo publications. She is also a regular photo contributor to Andrew Sullivan’s The Daily Dish.

Carli has taught for the Newspace Center for Photography, and The Oregon Zoo, and has spoken at numerous institutions including The Art Institute, and The Evergreen State College. And now she is stoked by the recognition of her work in the Huffington Post, and overwhelmed by the hits on her web site.

She is looking for representation.

Check out her amazing images on the link below:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/08/08/dogs-shaking-off-water_n_920885.html#s324411

or on her website:


http://carlidavidson.photoshelter.com/

Photo of Carli Davidson by Holly Andres
Photo of Carli Davidson by Holly Andres

Photo Carli Davidson
Photo Carli Davidson

Deutsche Börse Photography Prize April 30, 2011

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : Aftermath, American Photographers, Magnum, Photojournalism , add a comment

Photo Jim Goldberg MAGNUM
Photo Jim Goldberg MAGNUM

DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO. 2008. His radio is the sole possession that he took with him while escaping a rebel attack in his village. He now lives in a refugee camp with 60,000 other people where poverty, disease, and crime run rampant.

US photographer Jim Goldberg has received the 15th Photography Prize organised by The Photographers’ Gallery in London in association with Deutsche Börse.

Each year, the award goes to a living photographer that has made “the most significant contribution, in exhibition or publication format, to the medium of photography in Europe” over the past 12 months.

Magnum photographer Goldberg was nominated for his exhibition Open See, which went on show last year at The Photographers’ Gallery. He came ahead of three other photographers and artists – Thomas Demand, Roe Ethridge and Elad Lassry.

Open See “documents the experiences of refugee, immigrant and trafficked populations who travel from war torn, socially and economically devastated countries, such as Iraq, Bangladesh, China, The Balkans and Congo, to make new lives in Europe. Fusing Polaroids, video, written text, ephemera and large and medium format photographs, Goldberg, one of the world’s most innovative photographers, reflects on issues of migration and the conditions for desiring escape.”

Libya: No Concept; the photos of Katie Orlinsky April 25, 2011

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : American Photographers, FlakPhoto, Getty Images, Human Rights, Libya , add a comment

We are all connected in some small way.  I first met Katie Orlinsky at Visa Pour L’Image some three, four years ago.  She works as a photojournalist and her photos from Libya have made me realise how inadequate main stream media is at telling the story of conflict and the real story of the struggle in Libya. Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros are part of that connection as well.  Somehow the world seems closer and more intimate since their untimely death.  The outpouring of emotion on the web has somehow reconnected all of us interested in story telling. There are so many stories out there. Michael Brown, who was injured in Misrata, mentioned that Katie Orlinsky helped save his life. Budi Dharmawan, based in Yogyakata in Indonesia posted that information on Flak Photo Network, a blog put together by Andy Adams who I met at Foto Freo in 2010. Maggie Steber posted a thoughtful tribute to Tim Hetherington that I also received via Flak Photo Network.

The upshot was that I looked at Katie Orlinsky’s photos on Foto Visura and realised how powerful they were, and how important they were, and how much information they contained and how very very important photojournalism is.  Story telling and photojournalism will continue to develop as web technology continues to improve. My thanks to Katie Orlinsky for giving me an insight into Libya and into photojournalism.

http://www.fotovisura.com/user/KatieOrlinsky/viewfullpage/free-libya

http://www.katieorlinsky.com/

Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky
Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky

Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky
Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky

Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky
Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky

Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky
Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky

Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky
Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky

Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky
Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky

Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky
Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky

Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky
Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky

Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky
Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky

Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky
Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky

Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky
Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky

Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky
Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky

Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky
Free Libya Photo Copyright Katie Orlinsky


Quinn Jacobson WET COLLODION April 17, 2011

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : American Photographers, Art , add a comment

Quinn Jacobson is a fine art photographer with a special interest in early photographic processes who has published a book on the early chemical processes and sells it from his website. I came across his work in Square Magazine and wanted to share it with readers.

The work is hauntingly beautiful, painstaking and collaborative.

http://studioq.com/

Photo Quinn Jacobson
Photo Quinn Jacobson

WET COLLODION PROCESS

In 1846, Christian Frederick Schönbein (1799-1868) of Basel, Switzerland, discovered nitrated cotton (guncotton) by combining cotton fibers in a mixture of sulfuric and nitric acids. Two years later, in 1848, a young medical student in Boston by the name of John Parker Maynard formulated a durable, skin like, medical dressing (like liquid bandage) from the guncotton called “collodion” (from Greek kollōdēs, glutinous, glue-like) that could be used to treat wounds.

In 1850, Gustave Le Gray (1820-1884) proposed the idea that Dr. Parker’s collodion solution could be applied to photographic purposes because it was an excellent vehicle for holding a light-sensitive solution on glass.
In March 1851, Frederick Scott Archer (1813-1857) described an application of salted collodion on sheets of glass for the purpose of making glass plate negatives. Archer detailed a process where potassium iodide was combined with a solution of diluted collodion (diluted with alcohol and ether), applied to a glass plate, which was then immersed in a silver nitrate bath resulting in a light-sensitive layer of silver iodide. Unlike the handful of processes before collodion, Archer did not patent the process and died penniless a few years after its invention (1857).

CHEMICAL PICTURES A book on alternative photographic processes
http://studioq.com/chemical-pictures-book/

Photo Quinn Jacobson
Photo Quinn Jacobson

Lindsay Addario April 17, 2011

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : American Photographers, Libya, Photojournalism , add a comment

Lindsay Addario’s ordeal in Libya after being captured by pro-Gaddafi soldiers, along with Stephen Farrell videographer, Anthony Shadid, Tyler Hicks,  is placed in perspective by VII agency’s post of her work from Libya.

http://www.viiphoto.com/showstory.php?nID=1250

Lindsay Addario VII: Libyans demonstrate against Libyan leader Muammar al-Gaddafi, in Benghazi, Libya.
Lindsay Addario VII: Libyans demonstrate against Libyan leader Muammar al-Gaddafi, in Benghazi, Libya.

Inside Chornobyl April 12, 2011

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : American Photographers, Children of Chornobyl, Disaster, Documentary , add a comment

Chornobyl Accident Commemorative Exhibitions at The Ukrainian Museum

April 12, 2011

The Ukrainian Museum in New York and the Children of Chornobyl Relief and Development Fund are commemorating the 25th anniversary of the Chornobyl nuclear disaster with the Inside Chornobyl exhibition 17 April – 8 May 2011.

Inside Chornobyl
Photographs by Michael Rothbart and Alexander Kupny

Michael Forster Rothbart Photography
Michael Forster Rothbart Photography

The world’s worst nuclear disaster took place at the Chornobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine on April 26, 1986. Following an explosion in one of the plant’s reactors, a plume of radioactive fallout contaminated a huge area surrounding the plant and drifted across parts of the western Soviet Union and nearly all of Europe. After the accident, nearby towns and villages were evacuated and later abandoned. Some 350,000 people lost their homes. In the subsequent clean-up, 850,000 workers were exposed to radiation.

Michael Forster Rothbart photographed in Ukraine as an insider, spending time there.

Madison photographer Michael Forster Rothbart has returned from a year in Chernobyl. He received a U.S. Fulbright Scholarship to photograph and interview Ukrainians who remain in villages near Chernobyl a generation after the 1986 accident.

After Chernobyl, an exhibit of Forster Rothbart’s documentary photographs, will be displayed at various locations in both Madison, WI and on the East Coast during 2011. The exhibit reveals daily life for Chernobylites, including residents who chose to stay in the Chernobyl-affected region and liquidators, veterans of the massive Soviet clean-up after the accident.

“Most visitors think Chernobyl is a place of danger and despair, and so this is what they photograph. For me, however, Chernobyl tells a story about endurance and hope,” says Forster Rothbart. “I created this exhibit because I want the world to know what I know: the people of Chernobyl are not victims, mutants and orphans. They are simply people living their lives, with their own joys and sorrows, hopes and fears. Like you. Like me.”

Forster Rothbart was a staff photographer for University of Wisconsin-Madison for six years and worked previously as an Associated Press photographer in Kazakhstan. During the past year, he lived in Sukachi, Ukraine, a small farming village just outside the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. He also spent time in Slavutych, Ukraine, the city built after the accident to house evacuated Chernobyl plant personnel.

The Children of Chernobyl Organisation continues to deal with the aftermath of the acident, working with hospitals and orphanages in Ukraine in support and remediation. It is a task of huge proportions. This information came from Alexa Milantych CCRDF in Kyiv.


http://www.ccrdf.org/

Emphas.is Crowdfunding for Photojournalists March 30, 2011

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : American Photographers, Emphas.is , add a comment
Photo Carolyn Drake

Photo Carolyn Drake

Online crowdfunding has proven to be a  viable means of financially supporting creative projects. Sites like Kickstarter.com have enabled individuals to appeal directly to an audience and realize a range of ideas that otherwise would have had limited chances of getting off the ground.

Emphas.is, a recently launched crowdfunding website, is exclusively for project work by photojournalists. Its bold ambition is to create an environment where members of the public can fund projects and connect directly and more meaningfully with photographers in the field. This connectivity also encourages accountability as photographers are asked to provide project updates directly to their supporters.

“We did not want to ask the public for charity and donations towards photographic projects,” said the site’s co-founder Tina Ahrens. “We want to offer the reader something in return.” Ahrens said that Emphas.is is “built on the idea that in today’s media world, things have radically changed. People increasingly seek and rely on direct sources. They want to be able to engage on the issue that they care about.”

This new platform allows people an opportunity to support something they believe in and allows them to bring issues to the attention of a wider audience. The site also builds on the culture of social networks. “People want to be recommended something from someone close to them,” Ahrens said. “They want to decide how deeply they immerse themselves in a story. They want to discuss and shape it.”

Drake’s motivation for being among the first to test the viability of the site’s model is simple: “I just want to raise some money to keep working on my Uyghur project, to know I’m going there with actual funding.” She said that the site will hopefully put her in a position to explore new ideas, have creative flexibility and be in a good position to finish a project. “It would be nice if through this fundraiser I end up making contact with more people who share an interest in Uyghurs or in the themes of my work,” she said. “And I’d like to find new ways to have a dialogue about it.”

With much discussion and anxiety around the survival of photojournalism, Emphas.is offers a real focus for engagement and support. So far, the response has been positive. Within the first few days of the site going live, a total of $15,000 had been pledged. On March 29, Drake’s The Story of Uyghur became the first project to be successfully funded.

Edited from Lightbox.Time.Com

http://lightbox.time.com/2011/03/29/emphas-is-crowdfunding-for-photojournalists-from-the-series-photojournalism-at-the-crossroads/?iid=lb-late1#1

AFTERMATH March 30, 2011

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : Aftermath, Aid, American Photographers, Japan, Newsweek, Redux , add a comment

Q Sakamaki is a New York based photographer for the Redux Agency working in North East Japan for Newsweek and this essay looks at the tsunami aftermath and the return of people of people to what is left of their homes and communities.

Q Sakamaki documents the devastation.

http://www.newsweek.com/photo/2011/03/20/japan-devastation-sakamaki.html

Photo Q Sakamaki
Photo Q Sakamaki

Remote Control December 11, 2010

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : American Photographers, New Media, Technique , add a comment

Canon’s WFT-E4 II A Wireless File Transmitter and an Apple iPad

Professional photographer Scott Audette, who shoots NASA shuttle launches for Reuters, has assembled an innovative long-distance remote-control system for his Canon EOS 5D Mark II Digital SLR camera that includes Canon’s WFT-E4 II A Wireless File Transmitter and an Apple iPad. “I was in the lobby of a hotel in Titusville, Florida with my colleagues from the other wire services and a friend from Apple,” Audette recalled. “I asked if I could borrow his iPad and see if I could control my Canon 5D Mark II, which was attached to a Canon WFT-E4 II A Wireless File Transmitter and the other gear 26 miles away in the front window of our trailer at the Kennedy Space Center. We instantly dialed into the camera and were able to control it and take pictures with it. Everybody’s faces went blank as they realized what a game-changer this was for remotely capturing and transmitting images, and we knew it would be perfect for the next shuttle launch.”

Instructions:

http://scottaudette.com/?p=218

http://www.photographyblog.com/

AUDETTE_CANON_5D_MK_II_SHUTTLE-550x367

Michael Kamber MILITARY CENSORSHIP December 7, 2010

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : American Photographers, Bag News Notes , add a comment

BagNews is a progressive site dedicated to visual politics and the analysis of news images. The following audio video interview from  photographer Michael Kamber, a contract photographer for the New York Times outlines the changing scenario of military censorship in Iraq, both by the the US and the Iraqui forces.

Michael Kamber was born in Maine in 1963. He studied at the Parsons School of Design and has worked as a freelance journalist and photographer since 1986. His website link is http://www.kamberphoto.com/

An amazing insight into the difficulties of working as a journalist in Iraq.

http://www.bagnewsnotes.com/2010/10/mike-kamber-military-censorship/

Images by Michael Kamber
Images by Michael Kamber