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Globe and Mail’s Journalist Mark McKinnon: Ukraine’s president-elect comes to office with a strong mandate but no clear plan April 24, 2019

Posted by bohdan.warchomij in : Globe and Mail, Mark McKinnon, Metaphor Online , comments closed

AREA OF EXPERTISE

International relations, Canada’s role in the world

Mark MacKinnon is currently based in London, where he is The Globe and Mail’s Senior International Correspondent. In that posting he has reported on the refugee crisis, the rise of Islamic State, the war in eastern Ukraine, and the Brexit referendum. He was internationally recognized for his 2016 story “The Graffiti Kids,” which followed the lives of the teenagers who inadvertently started the Syrian war.

Mark spent five years as the newspaper’s Beijing correspondent. There he won accolades for his investigations into the garment industry in Asia and for his reporting from the 2011 tsunami and nuclear disaster in Japan.

Mark has also been posted to the Middle East and Moscow for The Globe and Mail. He has covered the arrival of Canada’s troops in Afghanistan, the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq, Russia’s war in Chechnya, the Orange Revolution in Ukraine and the 2006 Israel-Hezbollah conflict.

A seven-time National Newspaper Award winner, Mark is also the author of The New Cold War: Revolutions, Rigged Elections and Pipeline Politics - which was published in 2007 by Random House, and The China Diaries, an e-book of his train travels through the Middle Kingdom along with photographer John Lehmann.

He has interviewed many world leaders, including Shimon Peres, Aung San Suu Kyi, and Jordan’s King Abdullah II.

I first met and worked for Mark McKinnon in Ukraine in 2004 prior to and subsequently during  the Orange Revolution, the first protest by the Ukrainian nation to political corruption and electoral fraud. Our first assignment together was in the western based city of Lviv and we then spent three months together travelling the length and breadth of Ukraine covering the mounting protests throughout the country. From Lviv to Sevastapol to Karkiv to Kyiv I witnessed Mark McKinnon’s grasp of Ukrainian politics and his understanding of the Russian sphere of influence. MacKinnon’s first book, The New Cold War: Revolutions, Rigged Elections and Pipeline Politics in the Former Soviet Union was published in 2007 by Random House in Canada and later in the USA. (Bohdan Warchomij Photojournalist and author of PORTRAIT OF A REVOLUTION Published by Backpack Books in 2006, an account of Ukrainian independence from 1992 to the Orange  Revolution in 2004.)

GLOBE AND MAIL REPORT

All that’s clear, for now, about Volodymyr Zelensky, the comedian who is president-elect of Ukraine, is the size of his mandate. After his thumping win in Sunday’s election, Ukrainians, as well as the country’s neighbours, are waiting to see what Mr. Zelensky – who played a fictional president of Ukraine on television for three seasons – will do in real life.

Remarkably for a politician anywhere, he comes to office almost completely unburdened by commitments made on the campaign trail. While hammering away at the unpopular incumbent, Petro Poroshenko, Mr. Zelensky made only the vaguest of statements about what he would do if he had Mr. Poroshenko’s job.

Now that life is imitating art and Mr. Zelensky is set to become the leader of a country that is the front line of a confrontation between Russia and the West, the details of his plan – if he has one – will need to be quickly filled in.

There are high hopes, particularly among other anti-establishment politicians, that Mr. Zelensky – who has said he will consult with citizens about the problems they want his government to tackle then crowdsource the solutions – will shake up the region’s often-staid politics. But there are also deep concerns about who will be writing his scripts once he’s in power.

Western diplomats and business people, as well as officials in the outgoing government, told The Globe and Mail during the campaign that they were worried Mr. Zelensky would pull Ukraine off its pro-Western course in favour of closer relations with Moscow. Mr. Poroshenko helped advance that narrative with a series of bitter tweets Sunday night shortly after the scale of his defeat became clear.

“Just look at the celebrations in the Kremlin,” he wrote. “They believe that with a new inexperienced Ukrainian President Ukraine could be quickly returned to Russia’s orbit of influence.”

But while there’s little doubt that Russian President Vladimir Putin will be glad to see the ouster of Mr. Poroshenko – who helped hold Ukraine together after Russia annexed Crimea and stirred up a separatist rebellion in the Donbass region, rallying international support for punitive sanctions against Moscow – any victory parties in the Kremlin after Mr. Zelensky’s win were muted.

On Monday, Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev cautiously welcomed the election result, posting on his own Twitter account that “there is still a chance for Ukraine to improve its relations with Russia.” But Mr. Putin, who directly manages sensitive foreign files such as Ukraine, was silent, withholding official congratulations even as Mr. Zelensky took a phone call from U.S. President Donald Trump and received an invitation to visit Berlin from German Chancellor Angela Merkel. (In a statement, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he looked forward to working with Mr. Zelensky in order to deepen the Canada-Ukraine relationship and “build a more secure, more prosperous future for people in both our countries.”)

“It is too early to talk about President Putin offering his congratulations to Zelensky, as well as speaking about the possibilities of working together,” Mr. Putin’s spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, told reporters in Moscow. The Kremlin, Mr. Peskov made clear, was in wait-and-see mode regarding the president-elect. “It will only be possible to judge [him] by his actions.”

While Mr. Zelensky did take a more conciliatory line toward Russia than Mr. Poroshenko did during the campaign – saying he hoped to end the war in Donbass through a negotiated settlement with Mr. Putin, suggesting a willingness to consider a compromise over the status of Crimea and Donbass – it’s far from clear that he will bend to the Kremlin’s will.

If he is indeed a puppet – as some allege – the hand manipulating him is not Mr. Putin’s but that of Ihor Kolomoisky, a powerful Ukrainian oligarch. And while Mr. Kolomoisky’s aims may have coincided with those of Mr. Putin, in that they both wanted to be rid of Mr. Poroshenko (who ordered the seizure and nationalization of Ukraine’s largest bank amid accusations of fraud and mismanagement while it was owned by Mr. Kolomoisky), the oligarch also fought ferociously against Russian interference during the events of 2014, forming and funding a battalion of fighters that helped stop the separatist advance in eastern Ukraine.

Among the few hard commitments Mr. Zelensky did make on the campaign trail were promises to continue Ukraine’s drive for membership in the European Union and NATO, policies that are directly at odds with Mr. Putin’s ambition to pull Ukraine back into Russia’s sphere of influence.

But perhaps the most threatening thing of all about Mr. Zelensky, from the Kremlin’s point of view, is the size and nature of his election win. Mr. Putin, whose inner circle is also accused of massive corruption, will see little to admire in a political neophyte who comes from nowhere to upend the establishment.

Monday’s official count of the ballots confirmed the predictions of exit polls taken during the voting on Sunday, with Mr. Zelensky taking more than 73 per cent of the vote. Even more impressively, he claimed a majority in all but one of Ukraine’s 23 oblasts, or regions, where voting took place, winning over both the predominantly Russian-speaking east of the country and the Ukrainian-speaking west.

The campaign, which included an unpredictable first round that saw a field of 39 candidates narrowed down to Mr. Zelensky and Mr. Poroshenko after a first-round vote on March 31, as well as a head-to-head debate between the two finalists in the final days, was a breath of fresh air compared with the stagnant political scene in Moscow.

If he is indeed a puppet – as some allege – the hand manipulating him is not Mr. Putin’s but that of Ihor Kolomoisky, a powerful Ukrainian oligarch. And while Mr. Kolomoisky’s aims may have coincided with those of Mr. Putin, in that they both wanted to be rid of Mr. Poroshenko (who ordered the seizure and nationalization of Ukraine’s largest bank amid accusations of fraud and mismanagement while it was owned by Mr. Kolomoisky), the oligarch also fought ferociously against Russian interference during the events of 2014, forming and funding a battalion of fighters that helped stop the separatist advance in eastern Ukraine.

Among the few hard commitments Mr. Zelensky did make on the campaign trail were promises to continue Ukraine’s drive for membership in the European Union and NATO, policies that are directly at odds with Mr. Putin’s ambition to pull Ukraine back into Russia’s sphere of influence.

But perhaps the most threatening thing of all about Mr. Zelensky, from the Kremlin’s point of view, is the size and nature of his election win. Mr. Putin, whose inner circle is also accused of massive corruption, will see little to admire in a political neophyte who comes from nowhere to upend the establishment.

Monday’s official count of the ballots confirmed the predictions of exit polls taken during the voting on Sunday, with Mr. Zelensky taking more than 73 per cent of the vote. Even more impressively, he claimed a majority in all but one of Ukraine’s 23 oblasts, or regions, where voting took place, winning over both the predominantly Russian-speaking east of the country and the Ukrainian-speaking west.

The campaign, which included an unpredictable first round that saw a field of 39 candidates narrowed down to Mr. Zelensky and Mr. Poroshenko after a first-round vote on March 31, as well as a head-to-head debate between the two finalists in the final days, was a breath of fresh air compared with the stagnant political scene in Moscow.

Alexey Navalny, the most prominent member of Russia’s anti-Putin opposition, congratulated Ukraine for holding “honest elections – a rare thing in the territory of the former Soviet Union. Let Ukraine thrive, and Russia will be OK.”

In his acceptance speech Sunday night, Mr. Zelensky also suggested that Ukraine’s election could set an example for some of its neighbours. “To all post-Soviet countries: Look at us. Everything is possible.”

Ukraine election: Comedian Zelensky wins presidency by landslide April 22, 2019

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Ukrainian comedian Volodymyr Zelensky has won a landslide victory in the country’s presidential election, exit polls suggest.

The polls give the political newcomer, who dominated the first round of voting three weeks ago, more than 70% support.

Mr Zelensky, 41, challenged incumbent president Petro Poroshenko who has admitted defeat.

The apparent result is being seen as a huge blow to Mr Poroshenko and a rejection of Ukraine’s establishment.

“I will never let you down,” Mr Zelensky told celebrating supporters on Sunday.

“I’m not yet officially the president,” he added. “But as a citizen of Ukraine I can say to all countries in the post-Soviet Union: Look at us. Anything is possible!”

If polls are correct, he will be elected for a five-year term. Official results are expected to come in throughout Sunday night.

Mr Zelensky is best known for starring in a satirical television series in which his character accidentally becomes Ukrainian president.

The president holds significant powers over the security, defence and foreign policy of the country.

Humiliation for Poroshenko

Analysis by Jonah Fisher, BBC News, Kiev

Ukraine’s choice was between an experienced politician with five years as president on his CV and a comedian wielding little more than a blank sheet of paper. That so many people have opted for Volodymyr Zelensky is a humiliation for Petro Poroshenko.

Thirty-seven candidates were removed from the ballot paper from the first round and yet the president only picked up about 9% more votes this time. Mr Zelensky gained almost 45%.

This feels like a massive protest vote and for now Mr Zelensky and his campaign team are celebrating.

It’s hard to see the feeling lasting long. The hard work will come when they have to start fleshing out what are at the moment vague policies.

It’s one thing to have bold ideas but quite another to implement them.

Polls gave Mr Poroshenko, who has been in power since 2014, 25% of the vote.

“The outcome of the election leaves us with uncertainty [and] unpredictability,” he said after exit polls were released.

He added: “I will leave office but I want to firmly stress – I will not quit politics.”

But Russia’s foreign ministry said Ukrainian voters had expressed their desire for political change.

“The new leadership now must understand and realise the hopes of its electors,” deputy foreign minister Grigory Karasin told the Ria Novosti news agency. “This of course applies to domestic as well as foreign affairs.”

Meanwhile, Mr Zelensky told a news conference he would “reboot” peace talks with the separatists.

“We will… continue with the Minsk talks – we will reboot them,” he said.

“I think that we will have personnel changes. In any case we will continue in the direction of the Minsk talks and head towards concluding a ceasefire.”

Like his TV character, the real-life Zelenskiy has focused his campaign strongly on corruption. Although criticized as having a vague platform, Zelenskiy has made specific proposals, including removing immunity for the president, parliament members and judges, and a lifetime ban on holding public office for anyone convicted of corruption. He also calls for a tax amnesty under which someone holding hidden assets would declare them, be taxed at 5% and face no other measures.

He supports Ukraine’s eventual membership in NATO, but only if the country were to approve this in a referendum.

Zelenskiy has proposed that direct talks with Russia are necessary to resolve the conflict in eastern Ukraine, where fighting with Russia-backed separatist rebels has killed more than 13,000 people since 2014. The Kremlin denies involvement there and says it is an internal matter. Zelenskiy says Russia-annexed Crimea must be returned to Ukraine and compensation paid.

Zelenskiy’s image has been shadowed by his admission that he had commercial interests in Russia through a holding company, and by persistent speculation about links with oligarch Ihor Kolomoyskyi, who owns the television station that airs “Servant of the People.”

A Ukrainian court this week ruled that the nationalization of a bank once owned by Kolomoyskyi was illegal, leading to new concern about Zelenskiy’s possible ties to him.

Poroshenko, who entered politics after establishing a lucrative candy-making company, came to power with a pragmatic image in 2014 after mass protests drove the previous, Russia-friendly president to leave the country.

Five years later, critics denounce him for having done little to combat Ukraine’s endemic corruption. The war with Russia-backed separatists in the east grinds on with no clear strategy for ending it. And while his economic reforms may have pleased international lenders, they’ve left millions of Ukrainians wondering if they can find the money to pay their utility bills.

After his weak performance in the election’s first round, in which Zelenskiy got nearly twice as many votes, Poroshenko said he had taken voters’ criticism to heart. He has since made some strong moves, including the long-awaited creation of an anti-corruption court. He also ordered the dismissal of the governor of the corruption-plagued Odessa region, and fired the deputy head of foreign intelligence who reportedly has vast real estate holdings in Russia.

Poroshenko, 53, has positioned himself as a leader who will stand up to Russia. He has scored some significant goals for Ukraine’s national identity and its desire to move out of Russia’s influence.

He signed an association agreement with the European Union — which predecessor Viktor Yanukovych turned away from, setting off the 2014 protests. Ukrainians now can travel visa-free to the European Union, a significant perk. He has also pushed relentlessly for the Ukrainian Orthodox Church to be recognized as self-standing rather than just a branch of the Russian church.

Who is Volodymyr Zelensky?

Mr Zelensky starred in the long-running satirical drama Servant of the People in which his character accidentally becomes Ukraine’s president.

He plays a teacher who is elected after his expletive-laden rant about corruption goes viral on social media.

He ran under a political party with the same name as his show.

The Tragic Life of Andrew Mallard April 20, 2019

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A West Australian man who was wrongfully jailed for more than a decade has been killed in a hit-and-run crash in the United States. I first met Andrew Mallard at meetings of JusticeWA, where I also met Lindy Chamberlain and Rubin “Hurricane” Carter.  Two of the three have now passed away. Lindy Chamberlain is alive and is living with Rick Creighton her second husband.

Alice Lynne “Lindy” Chamberlain-Creighton (née Murchison; born 4 March 1948) is a New Zealand-born woman who was wrongfully convicted in one of Australia’s most publicised murder trials. Accused of killing her nine-week-old daughter, Azaria while camping at Uluru (then usually known as Ayers Rock) in 1980, she maintained that she saw a dingo leave the tent where Azaria was sleeping. The prosecution case was circumstantial and depended on forensic evidence.

Chamberlain was convicted on 29 October 1982, and her appeals to the Federal Court of Australia, and High Court of Australia, were dismissed. On 7 February 1986, after the discovery of new evidence, Chamberlain was released from prison on remission. She and her husband Michael Chamberlain, co-accused, were officially pardoned in 1987, and their convictions were quashed by the Supreme Court of Northern Territory in 1988.  In 1992, the Australian government paid Chamberlain $1.3 million in compensation for her wrongful conviction. She married Rick Creighton in 1992.

Andrew was a gentle man who was working and studying as an artist and visiting his fiancee in the city of Los Angeles. Paul Montani, the founder of JusticeWA, facilitated my meeting with all three of the above.

Andrew Mallard was grateful for his freedom after conviction of the murder of Pamela Lawrence in her Glyde Street Mosman shop.

WA Police have confirmed 56-year-old Andrew Mallard died in Los Angeles in a hit run case. LA Police are currently investigating the case. Andrew Mallard died at the scene of the crime despite receiving CPR from a bystander.

Mr Mallard was convicted of the brutal murder of Perth wife and mother Pamela Lawrence in 1995 and was sentenced to 20 years in prison.

He served 12 years in jail until the combined efforts of Colleen Egan journalist, John Quigley a Labour politician and a team of high-profile, pro bono lawyers including Malcolm McCusker finally saw him exonerated.

In a statement, the family of Andrew Mallard said they were shocked to learn overnight of his sudden death.

Former journalist Colleen Egan, who played a role in obtaining the acquittal of Mr Mallard, said she was assisting the family with media queries.

“His mother, Grace Mallard, sister Jacqui and brother-in-law Wayne are all devastated by the news,” she said in a statement.

“They are being assisted by the Australian consulate in the US.”

Sony Ambassador Victor Habchy Quits Photography April 19, 2019

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Victor Habchy‘s photography career took off after he became a Sony ambassador and when his dreamlike photos from Burning Man went wildly viral online a few years ago, and he has gone on to amass over 300,000 followers.  His photos are aesthetically beautiful, balanced and eloquent. Today Victor Habchy quit photography.

In a post on his Facebook page, Habchy explains why he’s turning away from his successful career of working for big clients like Adobe, representing Sony in France as part of Team Alpha, and sharing his work with a huge social media following.

The former professional photographer says it was never his plan to become a photographer — it’s a career that unexpectedly dropped into his lap when his photos went viral.

“It wasn’t my plan,” Habchy writes. “At first, I didn’t even [know] I could earn money. I was just doing it before I loved it. And from shoot to shoot, from years to years, I started to grow an audience.”

 

“Then I went to the Burning Man, probably the biggest turning point of my career,’ Habchy continues. “I posted the pictures online and went to sleep. The next morning, my mailbox was filled with request[s] from newspaper[s], with model[s] who wanted to meet, with messages of people saying how much they loved my pictures. It simply became viral. I was overwhelmed.”

In the subsequent 10 years, Habchy was hired by huge international brands, worked on commercials, traveled the world, and held an exhibition in Switzerland.

“I loved every single moment of it,” Habchy says. “But it is time for me to quit.”

The photographer says he’s walking away from the world of photography because he is no longer excited by it.

“Because I’ve done so many shoots, so many trips, so many pictures,” he writes. “I just want to move on.”

And in case you’re worried about the state of Habchy’s mental health:

“Don’t worry: I am not depressed, and still very curious about loads of topics,” he states, noting that he wants to explore new horizons and learn new things.”

Giving up photography is difficult to comprehend. Perhaps it is the surreal world that he has based his work on, an aesthetic world that has been created by artists with personal visions of a dimension that is both real and fictional. He has certainly mastered that aesthetic. His website certainly proves that. To move on requires courage. I wish him good fortune.

http://www.victorhabchy.com

Notre Dame Burns in Paris April 17, 2019

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A Montage of News Reports on the Notre Dame Fire

French President Emmanuel Macron, speaking in a televised address to the nation, said he wants the Notre Dame Cathedral to be rebuilt in five years.

“We will rebuild Notre Dame even more beautiful and I want that to be done in the next five years,” he said.

He continued: “Throughout our history, we have built towns, ports, churches. Many have been burnt due to revolutions, wars, due to mankind’s mistakes. Each time we have rebuilt them.

“The fire of Notre Dame reminds us that our story never ends. And that we will always have challenges to overcome. What we believe to be indestructible can also be touched,” Macron said.

Smithsonian Photo Concert: Winning Photographs April 12, 2019

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The Smithsonian 2019 Photo Contest is now open for business . https://www.smithsonianmag.com/photocontest/

https://newatlas.com/2019-smithsonian-photo-contest-winners/59208/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2019-04-10+004928+Australia+Daily+Plus+2019-04-10+005224+Electrical+brain+stimulation+winds+memory+function+back+50+years&utm_content=2019-04-10+004928+Australia+Daily+Plus+2019-04-10+005224+Electrical+brain+stimulation+winds+memory+function+back+50+years+CID_039780ab8d415b95e3ca20d066de90d9&utm_source=Campaign+Monitor&utm_term=Read+more&fbclid=IwAR3ngomMh_BahceG9YyGHo29A1ugApxo9lbC7aX4opGJd0rN5E8VLMgN_Ms#gallery

Paul Caporn: Perpetual Delays and Re-receptions at Art Collective WA April 12, 2019

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Paul Caporn // Perpetual Delays and Re-receptions

Paul Caporn

‘The works in this exhibition are originally drawn out of a video installation exhibited in 2000 at PICA. The structure of the screen consisted of a large, broken, cloud-like form constructed from steel rod polygons that you could walk through. Unlike geodesic structures, the polygon tiling of this architectural screen was irregular and random.

During the development of this work I became fascinated by mathematical tiling, particularly Penrose’s aperiodic types. Although I still don’t completely understand the maths, I am drawn to the possibilities of repetitive simple shapes creating a visually complex surface.

10 years later I was commissioned by the City of Perth to create a repetitive line work to be applied to the road around the Northbridge Piazza. The divided, rectangular prototile developed for this unrealised commission is the field from which these works have grown from.

Although influenced by the landscape and architecture these work are fed more through an intuitive process, grounded by a formal, non-objective position with a refusal to have any sense of a fixed meaning.’

Paul Caporn, 2019

Black and White Ruffed Lemur undergoes ENT procedure at Perth Zoo April 2, 2019

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Photo Melissa Leo Perth Zoo

Maphuti is an 11-year-old Black and White Ruffed Lemur who lives on the island at Perth Zoo’s main lake. After keepers noticed a lump on his nose he was sent to the Zoo vet department for a check-up where it was determined that an ENT specialist would be required for the delicate procedure to remove the growth (or samples of it) from Maphuti’s sinus.

 

The ENT specialist usually works with humans rather than animals, but has assisted at Perth Zoo previously. As primates and humans are so closely related, human specialists may occasionally be brought in to assist with animal health issues that require very specialised treatment.

The ENT Specialist was Shyan Vijayasekara.

 

There was a lot of planning and extra study involved to familiarise the ENT Specialist with the anatomy of lemurs. Special equipment was also brought in for the surgery. The procedure was successful in treating a fungal infection in the sinus, followed up with a course of medication to ensure that the infection has completely resolved.

Photo Melissa Leo Perth Zoo ENT Specialist, Shyan Vijayasekara, Perth Zoo Veterinarian, Alisa Wallace

 

Maphuti was brought back to the island after his recovery and has been in good health since.

 

 

Further Background on the species:

Black and White Ruffed Lemurs are critically endangered in the wild. Their main threats are habitat destruction and they are also hunted for food and the pet trade. Perth Zoo partners with the Madagascan Fauna and Flora Group to conserve native species in Madagascar including the Black-and-white Ruffed Lemur. Maphuti and the other lemurs on the island play a very important role as ambassador animals for their species. Visitors can book Eye to Eye encounters to visit them on the island at the Zoo’s main lake and learn more about these incredible primates. Perth Zoo is also part of a coordinated breeding program for this species to help save them from extinction.

 

Musicians of Appalachia Tintypes by Lisa Elmaleh March 28, 2019

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Lisa Elmaleh traded her Brooklyn apartment in 2012 for a wood cabin with no running water — but a “quite lovely” outhouse — on the outskirts of Paw Paw, West Virginia. Urban anonymity was soon replaced by small-town intimacy as she pursued her project of photographing traditional string musicians in Appalachia using, appropriately enough, traditional photographic processes.

She had decided to move there the very day she had done tintypes of Sam Herrmann and her husband, Joe, a couple dedicated to keeping old-time music alive. Paw Paw may not have Brooklyn’s hipster cachet, but it also “has everything that Brooklyn doesn’t” she added.

“What I gained by moving here is this community of people who live more deliberately and close to the land,” Ms. Elmaleh explained. “In Brooklyn I barely knew any of my neighbors. Here there’s more of a sense of belonging and being there for your neighbor when they need help.”

Neighbors let her build a darkroom in their house in exchange for helping with chores on the farm. When she was interviewed by phone recently, she had just finished moving dirt, spreading manure and helping with spring planting.

There are no riches or social media fame to be gained by playing old-time Appalachian music, just the pleasure of gathering with friends and playing tunes with the knowledge that you are maintaining a centuries-old tradition. Ms. Elmaleh plays guitar and accompanies her friends and neighbors when they gather for an evening of music.

Ms. Elmaleh’s community of musicians now stretches well beyond her new hometown of fewer than 1,000 residents. It includes people, throughout the Appalachians, who she has photographed. She uses a difficult to master wet-plate tintype process developed in the mid-1850s. The nature of this technique connects her work to both the history of photography and the history of traditional Appalachian music, she said.

“Each 8×10 tintype plate is hand coated, exposed in an antiquated large format camera, and developed on-site in a small darkroom in the back of my truck,” Ms. Elmaleh said. “The intimacy of the moment which the tintype creates, a multiple-second exposure, a moment of silence, shared between the musician and myself, is conveyed in each image.”

The tintype process results in an image that is reversed. So a right handed musician would look like they were left handed.

She has converted a 1996 Toyota Tacoma into a mobile darkroom that now has more than 300,000 miles on it (and often doubles as a bedroom while she is on the road). She usually spends a day or more with her subjects on their own land, she said, in order to portray “a deep connection to the musician and their surroundings.”

Ms. Elmaleh, who was raised in Miami, survives by teaching 19th century photographic processes and the occasional freelance assignment. It is a lifestyle she describes as “feast or famine.”

But most of the time she is at home in Paw Paw, trying to live a considered life, much like her old-time musician friends. “They are Americans who are carrying on a tradition that does not have a whole lot of vanity to it,” she said, “a music of a rural place, that speaks of a time when things were simpler.”

Camille Lepage Award 2019 March 27, 2019

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Call for Applications – Camille Lepage Award, 2019

On Tuesday 13th May 2014, the office of the French president confirmed the death of Camille Lepage,

a 26-year-old French photographer, who was killed while working in the war-torn Central African Republic.

Her body was found after French peacekeeping troops on patrol stopped a car driven by Christian “anti-balaka” fighters

near a town in the west of the country. “Everything will be done to uncover the circumstances of this assassination

and to track down who murdered our compatriot,” read the statement from President François Hollande’s office.

Lepage’s murder marked a grim milestone: the first death of a Western journalist covering the disastrous conflict

in the Central African Republic. In her last post on Instagram, Lepage said she was embedding with an anti-balaka

outfit and traveling for hours down routes chosen to avoid the checkpoints of African peacekeepers.

Here’s the picture she posted of the fighters she was accompanying.

The Association named “Camille Lepage – On est ensemble” was founded on September 20, 2014, only months after the death of the photojournalist Camille Lepage while reporting in the Central African Republic.
The association was set up by her family (her parents Maryvonne & Guy Lepage
and brother Adrien) to commemorate Camille, her work and commitment, to provide assistance and protection for photojournalists working in conflict areas, to support communities that are victims of such conflicts, and, while doing so, to promote values that were so important to Camille.
The publishing house CDP Editions – Collection des photographes published the book of Camille Lepage’s last reports in the Central African Republic, République centrafricaine: On est ensemble, and generously donated all proceeds from sales to the Association Camille Lepage – On est ensemble.
Through this initiative, the Association Camille Lepage – On est ensemble was able to set up the Camille Lepage Award, and fund part of the prize money during two years, jointly with the Saif*.
The award will provide support and encouragement for a photojournalist carrying out a long-term project. This year, the award is being fully sponsored by the Société des Auteurs des arts visuels et de l’Image Fixe – Saif* with prize money of 8000 euros.
The Award will be presented for the fifth time in Perpignan at the International Festival of Photojournalism Visa pour l’Image-Perpignan 2019. The award is designed to help a photographer carry out and complete a reporting project which is already under way. Applicants must be professional photojournalists. There is no age limit or restriction on nationality or gender.
The jury of professionals working in photography and the press and a representative of la Saif will meet in late middle of June to select the winner. Applications will be judged on the basis of the current project and the applicant’s previous work. Criteria will include the quality of the photography, the journalistic approach and significance of the story chosen, as well as the photographer’s continuing long-term commitment to an issue or a country.
The Award will be officially presented at an evening show at the International Festival of Photojournalism Visa pour l’Image-Perpignan in September 2019. The Award-winning report must be completed within one year so that it can be presented, either as an exhibition or feature in an evening show, at the 2020 International Festival of Photojournalism Visa pour l’Image-Perpignan.
This year, for the 31th edition of the festival, the work of Kasia Stręk / Item (2018 winner) on Egypt where abortion is illegal, and the consequences of the ban will be presented during one of the evening shows.
Deadline: May 16, 2019. Rules and Application Form:http://www.visapourlimage.com/en/festival/awards/prix-camille-lepageFurther information: camillelepageaward@gmail.com